Understanding Server Colocation

Whether you are a local small business or a medium sized franchise, it is crucial that you establish an online presence. Even if you are in the development stages, then this is a great time to form a plan for developing a presence on the web. The fact is, as time goes on, we are moving more and more into the age of technology. If your company does not have a website, then you could potentially be losing out on tens, maybe even hundreds of thousands of dollars a year in profits.

Large corporations became aware of this fact years ago, and they have taken the time to properly expand their brand to satisfy the needs of a growing online community of consumers. You can learn a lot about what a strong, authoritative web presence should look like by visiting the website of any large corporation. A couple of things that you’ll notice are how incredibly fast their website loads, the quality of their design, and how easy it is to interact with, and if you’re there for any length of time, you’ll also notice that their website never has any downtime.

Once you have a well-designed web page, you will want to find a web hosting company that will allow you to have the same speed and reliability enjoyed by larger corporations. Server colocation is one of the best options out there for providing you with this level of service. This option allows you to place your own personal server in someone else’s rack at their hosting facility, and you get to share in their bandwidth.

Data Centers Life Cycle Infographic

There are a couple of things that you may want to keep in mind if you decide to pursue the server colocation option. It’s best to find a facility within your local area for your hosting. If you are not local, or you decide to move and leave your server at that particular facility, then you may need to sign a maintenance contract and pay for additional fees.

At times, you may need physical access to your server (i.e. a hardware or memory upgrade), and you don’t want to have to drive hundreds of miles just to get to the hosting facility. Of course, it may be difficult to find a local hosting provider nearby, especially if you don’t live in or around a large city. Bear in mind that the facility you use for your hosting is a business, and you will need to plan all of your physical access arrangements around their business hours.

Another thing to be aware of is that server colocation subjects you to price fluctuations. Since you will be paying, in large part, for the data used, spikes in traffic will cause your bill to rise in price. Of course, chances are you need the increased traffic to make increased revenue, and you should consider that carefully before you decide whether or not to go with this or another, cheaper web hosting option.